29 Singular Pronoun Examples: Use, Sentences And Detailed Explanations


This article will first explain what singular pronouns are and how they may be used, and will then provide 30+ singular pronoun examples with detailed explanations.

Singular pronouns are those pronouns which are used to replace singular nouns in sentences. A singular noun, as the word suggests, refers to a noun that applies to only one person, place, animal, or thing.

Singular Pronoun Sentences:

  1. I am Anamika. What is your name?
  2. You look new here. Can I help you find your class?
  3. Don’t worry about him, he is always like this. He is always upset about something or another.
  4. Oh my god, what is that thing? It looks so big and scary. I hope it isn’t coming towards us.
  5. Were you talking to me? I’m sorry, I had my earphones on. I couldn’t hear you.
  6. There is something impressive about her confidence. She never shies away from taking on leadership roles.
  7. Your phone looks just like mine! What model is it?
  8. Hi Eklavya. This keychain must be yours. I found it lying near your desk.
  9. His manner of speaking is very impressive. Not everybody can speak like him.
  10. I bought myself milk chocolate, and I bought you dark chocolate instead—because I know you don’t like sweet things.
  11. You need to start doing things yourself, Akash.
  12. Isn’t it strange that Shreshtha is always talking to herself?
  13. This pen isn’t working. Could you pass me another one?
  14. Anybody can learn how to dance if they are willing to try.
  15. Nobody is completely alone in their thoughts. There is always somebody else who thinks just like you.
  16. This pen isn’t working. Could you pass me another one?
  17. Anybody can learn how to dance if they are willing to try.
  18. Nobody is completely alone in their thoughts. There is always somebody else who thinks just like you.
  19. No one was at Shwetha’s party yesterday because they were all busy studying for their exams.
  20. Is there anything on your mind? You look worried.
  21. There is something kind about her appearance.
  22. Each and every person is good at something.
  23. Happiness and sadness are both a part of life. You cannot avoid either.
  24. I don’t know how I am supposed to be a good basketball player when I am neither tall nor athletic.
  25. Please don’t add any more sugar to my tea. One teaspoon is enough.
  26. We have already covered everything in the syllabus. There are no other chapters that will be coming in the exams.
  27. One should always respect their elders.
  28. I heard there will be a new kid joining our class soon. Do you know where they are from?
  29. If you want someone to learn something, you must always allow them to make their own mistakes.
  30. Just because someone hurt your feelings once, it does not mean you ignore them forever.

Now, let use look at detailed explanations for the 30+ singular pronoun examples:

I am Anamika. What is your name?

In this sentence, the first person singular pronoun “I” is the object of the sentence and used by Anamika to introduce herself.

You look new here. Can I help you find your class?

Here, the second person singular pronoun“you” is the subject of the sentence and is used to reference an unknown person.

Don’t worry about him, he is always like this. He is always upset about something or another.

Here, the singular pronoun “he” is the subject of the sentence, and is used to reference a third person.

Oh my god, what is that thing? It looks so big and scary. I hope it isn’t coming towards us.

In the above sentence, the singular pronoun “it” is used to reference an unknown thing.

Were you talking to me? I’m sorry, I had my earphones on. I couldn’t hear you.

In this sentence, the singular pronoun “me” is the object of the sentence.

There is something impressive about her confidence. She never shies away from taking on leadership roles.

Here, the singular pronoun “her” is the object of the sentence, while the singular pronoun “she” is the subject.

Your phone looks just like mine! What model is it?

Here, the singular possessive pronoun “mine” is used to refer to the speaker’s phone.

Hi Eklavya. This keychain must be yours. I found it lying near your desk.

Here, the singular pronoun “yours” is a possessive pronoun that allows us to know that the object (keychain) belongs to Eklavya.

His manner of speaking is very impressive. Not everybody can speak like him.

Here, the singular pronoun “his” allows us to know we are talking about an unknown person’s “manner of speaking.” Meanwhile, the indefinite pronoun “everybody” refers to all other people.

I bought myself milk chocolate, and I bought you dark chocolate instead—because I know you don’t like sweet things.

Here, the singular pronoun “myself” is a reflexive pronoun that allows the object (“I”) of the verb (“bought”) to refer to itself.

You need to start doing things yourself, Akash.

Here, the singular pronoun “yourself” is a reflexive pronoun that allows the object (“you”) of the verb (“doing things”) to refer to itself.

Isn’t it strange that Shreshtha is always talking to herself?

Here, the singular pronoun “herself” is a reflexive pronoun that allows the object (“Shwetha”) of the verb (“talking”) to refer to itself.

This pen isn’t working. Could you pass me another one?

In this sentence, the singular indefinite pronoun “another” is used to refer to an additional pen.

Anybody can learn how to dance if they are willing to try.

In this sentence, the singular indefinite pronoun “anybody” is used to refer to all individual people.

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Nobody is completely alone in their thoughts. There is always somebody else who thinks just like you.

Here, “somebody” is a singular indefinite pronoun used to refer to an unknown person.

No one was at Shwetha’s party yesterday because they were all busy studying for their exams.

Here, “no one” is a singular indefinite pronoun meaning “not a single person.”

Is there anything on your mind? You look worried.

Here, the singular indefinite pronoun “anything” refers to “any thing in particular.”

There is something kind about her appearance.

In this sentence, the singular indefinite pronoun “something” is used to refer to an unknown thing.

Each and every person is good at something.

In this sentence, the singular indefinite pronoun “each” allows all people to be considered individually.

Happiness and sadness are both a part of life. You cannot avoid either.

In this sentence, the singular indefinite pronoun “either” is used to compare the prevalence of happiness and sadness in life.

I don’t know how I am supposed to be a good basketball player when I am neither tall nor athletic.

In this sentence, the singular indefinite pronoun “neither” is used to convey that the person speaking is both short and unathletic.

Please don’t add any more sugar to my tea. One teaspoon is enough.

Here, the singular indefinite pronoun “enough” is used to convey that one teaspoon of sugar is all that is required.

We have already covered everything in the syllabus. There are no other chapters that will be coming in the exams.

Here, the singular indefinite pronoun “other” refers to any additional chapters.

One should always respect their elders.

In this sentence, the singular indefinite pronoun “one” refers to every individual person.

I heard there will be a new kid joining our class soon. Do you know where they are from?

In this sentence, the singular “they” is used to refer to the unknown new kid.

If you want someone to learn something, you must always allow them to make their own mistakes.

In this sentence, the singular “them” and the singular “their” is used to refer to an unknown person (“someone”).


Just because someone hurt your feelings once, it does not mean you ignore them forever.

In this sentence, the singular “them” is used to refer to an unknown person (“someone”).

Singular Pronoun Use:

The table below contains singular pronoun examples of the same nouns written in both singular and
plural form:

SingularPlural
womanwomen
tomatotomatoes
monkeymonkeys
ideologyideologies
personpeople
deerdeer

There are four types of pronouns that you should know. These include subject pronouns, object pronouns, possessive pronouns, and reflexive pronouns.The singular form of all four of these types of pronouns are listed below for your reference:

 Subject PronounsObject PronounsPossessive pronounsReflexive pronouns
First person (singular)Imeminemyself
Second person (singular)youyouyoursyourself
Third person (singular)he/ she/ theyhim/ her/ themhis/hers/theirshimself/ herself/ themselves
Object or thingititN/Aitself

In the last few years, it has become common to use they, them, their, theirs, and themselves as both singular and plural pronouns.

They, them, their, theirs, and themselves can be used to describe any generic third person who subscribes to an undisclosed or undefined gender identity.

Singular pronouns can also be indefinite. The word “indefinite” implies that something is vague or unknown. Indefinite pronouns refer to those pronouns that are ambiguous—and do not refer to any particular person, amount, or thing. Here are some singular pronoun examples of indefinite pronouns:

Indefinite pronounMeaning
anotherUsed to reference an additional or different person or thing
anybody/anyoneRefers to any particular person
somebody/someoneRefers to an unknown person
nobody/nooneNot a single person
anythingRefers to any particular thing
somethingRefers to an unknown thing
eachrefers to every element of two or things, while considering them separately
eitherused to suggest a similarity or connection between two things
neithernot either
lessA smaller amount of something
littleA small amount of something
muchA large amount of something
enoughAn optimal amount
everybody/everyoneEvery person
everythingall things
otheradditional
oneA single thing or person

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