3 Facts On Use Of Practise In Tense(Present, Past, Future)

The verb tense is a grammar component that enables us to determine the time of an action. The usage of the verb “practise” in all tenses will be examined in this article.

The verb “practise” means to do something repeatedly, to engage in something often, to adhere to, follow or observe certain beliefs or ideals, and to work in a legal or medical profession. The inflections in the simple, continuous, perfect continuous, and perfect forms of the verb “practise” signify all three tenses.

This article will provide a detailed explanation of how to use the verb “practise” to explain the time frame in which the aforementioned activities take place.

“Practise” in present tense

The present tense pertains to any verb that indicates an activity that takes place frequently or right now. We will examine all present-tense forms usages of the verb “practise.”

The verb “practise” in the present tense is used as ‘practise,’ ‘practises,’ ‘has/have practiced,’ ‘am/is/are practicing,’ and ‘has/have been practising’ in the simple present, present perfect, present continuous and present perfect continuous forms respectively.

When is “practise” used in the present tense?

The verb “practise” is used to denote acts that routinely (regularly) take place or are happening right now, such as doing something repeatedly, adhering to, following, or observing certain beliefs, thoughts, or ideals, engaging in something often, or working in a legal or medical profession. 

Examples of “practise” in the present tense

ExamplesExplanations
a. I/ We practise playing guitar almost daily as I/ we want to become a part of the school band.
 
b. You practise playing guitar almost daily as you want to become a part of the school band.
 
c. Niharika practises playing guitar almost daily as she wants to become a part of the school band.
 
d. Sudha and Vishal practise playing guitar almost daily as they want to become a part of the school band.
These example sentences utilize the verb “practise” in its two simple present tense forms, “practise” and ‘practises’ (an inflected form of the basic verb that is created by adding as ‘s’). These sentences’ use of the simple present tense verb forms “practise” and “practises” denote that the subject constantly or regularly (occurs every day -daily) repeats the act of playing guitar as she/he/they want to become a part of the school band.  
a. Currently, I am practising law with one of the most reputed law firms in the nation.
 
b. Currently, we are practising law with one of the most reputed law firms in the nation.
 
c. Currently, you are practising law with one of the most reputed law firms in the nation.
 
d. Currently, my brother is practising law with one of the most reputed law firms in the nation.
 
e. Currently, his children are practising law with one of the most reputed law firms in the nation.
In these instances, the verb “practise” is used to express the present continuous tense as in ‘am/is/are practising.’ The present continuous form (practising) is created by adding the suffix ‘-ing’ to the verb “practise,” and it shows that the subject is currently or presently (happening right now) working with one of the most reputed law firms in the nation.
a. I/we have practised very hard for this competition for five months.  
 
b. You have practised very hard for this competition for five months.  
 
c. Nisha has practised very hard for this competition for five months.  
   
d. The boys in my class have practised very hard for this competition for five months.  
The verb forms ‘has practised’ and ‘have practised’ in these situations denote the subject’s act of repeatedly doing something. The subject’s action of repeatedly trying something very hard is shown using the present perfect tense, which is formed with the aid of the past participle of the basic verb “practise,” ‘practised,’ and has been happening for five months and proceeds to happen even this day (today – now).
a. For three months now, I/we have been practising for my/our school’s annual day dance.
 
b. For three months now, you have been practising for your school’s annual day dance.
 
c. For three months now, Latika has been practising for her school’s annual day dance.
 
d. For three months now, all the students have been practising for their school’s annual day dance.
In these instances, the action word (verb) “practise” is used in the present perfect continuous tense as in ‘has/have been practising.’ The present perfect continuous form in these examples indicates that the subject has been engaging in dancing regularly for the school’s annual day function for three months now. Before three months, the practise for the school’s annual day dance started, and it has continued ever since.
Usage Of “Practise” In The Present Tense Forms

“Practise” in past tense

The past tense is used for verbs that show actions that have already concluded or were completed before this moment. We will study all the past tense forms that “practise” denotes.

The verb “practise” when used in the past tense, can take the following grammatical tense forms: ‘practised,’ ‘had practised,’ ‘was/were practicing,’ and ‘had been practising,’ in the simple past, past perfect, past continuous, and past perfect continuous forms, respectively.

When is “practise” used in the past tense?

The past tense of the verb “practise” is used to convey acts such as adhering to, following, or observing certain beliefs, thoughts, or ideals, engaging in something often, working in a legal or medical profession, or doing something repeatedly that began and finished in the past (before now).

Examples of “practise” in the past tense

ExamplesExplanations
a. I practised medicine two years back when I was in London.
 
b. We practised medicine two years back when we were in London.
 
c. You practised medicine two years back when you were in London.
 
d. The husband and wife practised medicine two years back when they were in London.
In these cases, the verb “practise” becomes ‘practised’ by adding the suffix ‘-ed.’ In these statements, the simple past tense is used to indicate that the activity of working as a doctor took place or occurred two years back ( happened before 2 years) when the subject was in London.
a. When Rajith met me two years ago, I was practising Hinduism.  
 
b. When Rajith met us two years ago, we were practising Hinduism.  
 
c. When Rajith met you two years ago, you were practising Hinduism.  
 
d. When Rajith met her two years ago, Shravani was practising Hinduism.  
 
e. When Rajith met them two years ago, they were practising Hinduism.  
The suffix ‘-ing’ changes the action word (verb) “practise” in these lines. The past continuous form of the base verb “practise” is ‘was/were practising.’ The past continuous tense form is used in these sentences to emphasize the fact that the subject was adhering to or following the religion of Hinduism (was happening two years ago – a time in the past – before two years) at the time when Rajith met the subject.
a. Though I/We/You/She/ They had practised the speech many times, I/we/you/she/they did not remember anything on the stage.   The assisting word ‘had’ is combined with the past participle of the basic verb “practise” to form the past perfect tense. The past perfect tense employed here in this sentence, ‘had practised,’ suggests that the person had repeatedly said the speech many times (happened sometime before in the past) before going to stage, but still he, they or she did not remember anything on the stage.
a. I/We/You/She/They had been practising law under my/our/your/her/their own father when Sajith met them last year.  The verb form ‘had been practising’ in this line is in the past perfect continuous tense. The past perfect continuous form used here in this example sentence suggests that the subject was working as a lawyer under his, their, or her own father (it was taking place at the same time when Sajith met the subject) last year (the previous year).
Usage Of “Practise” In The Past Tense Forms

“Practise” in future tense

The future tense applies to any verb that denotes an event that will take place after this moment (right now). We shall examine all the future tense forms of the verb “practise”.

The verb “practise” in the future tense takes different variations (forms) such as, ‘will practise,’ ‘will have practised,’ ‘will be practicing,’ and ‘will have practising’ in the simple future, future perfect, future continuous and future perfect continuous tenses respectively.

When is “practise” used in the future tense?

The verb “practise” in the future tense is utilized to show the actions of engaging in something often, working in a legal or medical profession, adhering to, following, or observing certain beliefs or thoughts, or doing something repeatedly, that will begin and end in the future, that is, after the current moment.

Examples of “practise” in the future tense

ExamplesExplanations
a. I/We/You/he/They will practise day and night and somehow win the match.      The basic verb “practise” in this line is presented as ‘will practise’ by adding the modal auxiliary ‘will’ in order to create the future tense. According to the simple future tense form ‘will practise,’ the subject has not yet performed the action practising for the match but will do so going forward (from this point to a future time) and somehow win the match.
a. I/we/you/he/they will be practising medicine when Mr.Gupta meets them the next year.    As the subject will be working as a doctor in the future (next year), the action word (verb) “practise,” which is employed in this example in the future continuous tense form ‘will be practising,’ conveys that the action is yet to occur. It is clear from the use of the future continuous tense in this sentence that the subject working as a doctor will happen in the next year (the following year) when Mr. Gupta meets them (which will also take place the following year).
a. I/We/You//he/They will have practised quite wellby this day next month as I/we/you/he/they have a match at the end of the next month.The basic action word (verb) “practise” is replaced in the future perfect tense with ‘will have practised.’ This example makes use of it to suggest that either the subject will not have repeated the act of preparing for the match quite well by this day (present date) next month (the following month) or that they will have repeated the act of preparing for the match quite well by this date in the next month as he, she, or they have a match at the end of the next month (future).
a. Once I/we/you/she/they are defeated in this match by the opponent team, I/we/you/he/they will have been practising hard in order to win the next match. According to the future perfect continuous tense of the verb “practise”—‘will have been practising,’ when the subject is defeated (not yet happened) in this match by the opponent team, they, she or he will have been frequently, regularly or often practising (which will take place in the future once they get defeated in this match by the opponent team) hard in order to win the next match.
Usage Of “Practise” In The Future Tense Forms

Conclusion

Thus, this article illustrates how to represent the action word (verb) “practise” in all variations (forms) of the present, past, and future tenses. It should also be noted that in American English, the verb “practise” is used with the spelling ‘practice.’

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