Is Crowded Adjective Or Verb? 5 Facts You Should Know


There are many words in the English Language that have different grammatical functions and forms. Let us take a deeper look into this phenomenon.

“Crowded” can be regarded as an adjective or verb depending on the context and also the way it is placed in a sentence.

Let us explore a little more on this topic with the help of a few facts and examples.

When is “crowded” an adjective?

As mentioned before a word like “crowded” has a couple forms when it comes to grammar. Let us take a look at one of them.

“Crowded” is considered as an adjective when it is used before a noun. Since adjectives are also determiners, “crowded” must be used to determine state of a noun for it to be considered as an adjective.

Let us take a look at a couple examples on this topic.

ExamplesExplanations
1. The marketplace tends to be crowded during evenings; therefore, we should go now when it will be mostly empty.Adjectives are sometimes used to characterize nouns without being placed before them. Adjectives are still regarded as words that seem to have a direct descriptive aspect in relation to a noun, as evidenced by the use of the adjective ‘crowded’ in this sentence.
2. The airport is crowded now but it will empty in a while after some of the plane departure.Again, adjectives are frequently sufficient to describe nouns without coming immediately before them. Adjectives are still regarded as words that seem to have a direct descriptive aspect in relation to a noun, as evidenced by the use of the adjective ‘crowded’ in this sentence.
3. We went to a really crowded fair and had the best times of life due to all the rides and food.As seen in this sentence, it is quite evident that the word ‘crowded’ in this situation functions as an adjective because it gives the noun it has been employed in front of a descriptive aspect and provides further information about the state or scenario of said noun.
4. We went to a crowded palace as it was also a really popular tourist spot.Because it adds a descriptive element to the situation of the noun it has been used in front of and provides further information about the state or circumstance of said noun, it is pretty obvious that the word ‘crowded’ in this case works as an adjective.
5. Our home is crowded because of renovation work, therefore, please come back another time.Once again, as seen here, sometimes adjectives are used to describe nouns without coming before them. As seen by the use of the adjective ‘crowded’ in this line, adjectives are still thought of as words that appear to have a direct descriptive element in connection to a noun.
Examples of “crowded” as an adjective.

Is “crowded” a quantitative adjective?

There are many forms of adjectives in the English Language and “crowded” is one of them. Let us take a look.

“Crowded” is not a quantitative adjective as the word refers to an unsaid group of people, things, or situations. It does describe the noun it has been placed in front of, yes, but in this specific case it still renders a quality of description of state or situation to the noun and not a quantity.

Let us understand with the help of a couple examples about how “crowded” is a descriptive adjective and not a quantitative adjective.

ExamplesExplanations
1. This is quite a crowded café so we should go somewhere else.As it is clear from this example that a word like ‘crowded’ describes the said noun in question but the quantity of entities it refers to is unnamed, in this case that quantity of entities being a large group of people. Since the adjective ‘crowded’ does not directly describe the said ‘people’ and rather the space that those ‘people’ occupy, it cannot be considered a quantitative adjective.
2. We walked through a crowded park, but it was still quite fun.Here too, as it is evident from this example, a term like ‘crowded’ refers to the aforementioned noun in the sentence but does not name the quantity of individuals it refers to, in this case that being a sizable number of people. The adjective ‘crowded’ cannot be regarded as a quantitative adjective because it refers to the space that the supposed ‘people’ occupy rather than the actual ‘people’ themselves.
Examples of “crowded” as a descriptive adjective.

Is “crowded” a verb?

Apart from an adjective, the term “crowded” has one other grammatical form. Let us take a look into what that might be.

“Crowded” is a verb when used in a certain way and context. It is important for this word to be used as an action being taken place by the object or subject of a sentence for it to be considered a verb.

Let us take a look at a couple examples on “crowded” being used as a verb.

ExamplesExplanations
1. The students crowded around their teacher on the first day of school.As one can see, the term ‘crowded’ has been employed as a verb since it is used within a context of being an action and not a descriptor.
2. A huge group of people crowded on the street to see what happened.Once again, the word ‘crowded’ has been used in a way to showcase action, consequently making it a verb.
Examples of “crowded” as a verb.

When is “crowded” a verb?

“Crowded” is a verb when it is used as a doing word, as most verbs, that is to be used in context of being an action put in place rather than describing the state of a person, thing, or situation.

Let us understand the concept of “crowded” as a verb with the help of a few more examples.

ExamplesExplanations
1. They crowded the mall due to a huge ongoing sale that was happening.Once more, the word ‘crowded’ has been transformed into a verb by being used in a way that highlights it as an action that is being taken place and is not being used a s a way to describe a person, thing, or situation.
2. The parents crowded into the teacher’s lounge during open house.When used in the appropriate context, as it is in this instance, the word “crowded” itself can be used as a verb. This is because the word is particularly being employed in action and not as a descriptor.
3. The on-lookers crowded around the street play that was taking place.Once more, by emphasising that it is an action that is taking place rather than being used to describe a person, thing, or circumstance, the word ‘crowded’ has been changed from an adjective to a verb.
4. Our family crowded around the television waiting for the game results.As one can see here, in this given example that by emphasizing its role as a form of action and not a description, the word ‘crowded’ has been changed from a adjective to a verb.
5. Passers-by crowded the museum to take a look at the new exhibit.The term ‘crowded’ itself can be employed as a verb when utilised in the right situation, as it is in this case. This is due to the word’s specific use in action rather than as a description.
Examples of “crowded” as a verb.

Is “crowded” a noun?

Apart from an adjective, the term “crowded” has one other grammatical form. Let us take a look into what that might be.

“Crowded” is not a noun. It has been derived from the noun “crowd”, but the word itself cannot, in any circumstance, function as a noun.

Conclusion

Therefore, it can be concluded that the word “crowded” can smoothly function as an adjective as well as a verb, provided it is used in the correct context.

Vriddhi Kapoor

Hi.....I’m a graduate with a Bachelor’s degree in English Literature. I wish to do a Masters in the same field someday and continue my career in Academia. Let's connect through LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vriddhi-kapoor-513bb4202

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