25 Conjunction Phrase Examples: Sentences, Uses And Facts


When two or more words together form a phrase and when they perform the job of connecting or joining words, clauses or sentences, then they are called as conjunction phrases.

The table below consists of sentences that are connected or linked with the aid of conjunction phrases.

ExamplesConjunction Phrases Explanations
1. You either complete your homework or prepare for tomorrow’s class test.either…orIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “either…or” is not used together, but separately in two different clauses.
 
It connects two ideas “you should complete your homework” and “or should prepare for tomorrow’s class test” into a single sentence.
2. Both the football match and the throw ball match took place today.both…andIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “both…and” is not used together, but is used separately in two different clauses.
 
It helps to connect two ideas “the football match took place today” and “the throw ball match took place today” into a single sentence.
3. Rohit is not only rich but also very humble.not only…but also Here, the conjunction phrasenot only…but also” is used not together as a whole, but separately in two different clauses.
 
It helps to connect two ideas “Though Rohit is rich” and “Rohit is very humble” into a single sentence.
4. As soon as the vice president came, the meeting was commenced.as soon asIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “as soon as” is used together as whole in the beginning of the sentence as a connector.
 
It helps to connect the ideas “the vice president came” and “the meeting was commenced immediately” into a single sentence.
5. Such is the seriousness of the problem that it cannot be solved quickly.such that In this sentence, the conjunction phrase “such…that” is not used together as a single phrase, but is used separately in two different clauses.
 
It helps in connecting two ideas “the problem is very serious” and “it thus cannot be solved quickly” into one single sentence.
6. You can rather paint something useful than waste your time scribbling.rather thanIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “rather…than” is not used together as a whole, but is utilized separately in two different clauses.
 
It helps in linking two different the ideas “you can paint something useful” and “do not waste your time scribbling” into one single sentence.
7. I am not sure whether I would go to my friend’s birthday party or to have dinner with my family.whether…orIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “whether…or” is not used together as a whole, but is utilized separately in two different clauses.
 
It helps in linking two different the ideas “I am not sure if I want to go my friend’s birthday party” and “or I should go to have dinner with my family” into one single sentence.
8. Suha wants to eat both ice cream and fruit salad for dessert.
 
both…andIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “both…and” is not used together as a whole, but is used separately in two different clauses.
 
It helps to join two ideas “Suha wants to eat ice cream for dessert” and “Suha wants to eat salad for dessert” into a single sentence.
9. We had scarcely completed our day’s work when our manager gave us more work to do.“scarcely…when” is the conjunction phrase used. In this sentence, the conjunction phrase “scarcely…when” is not used together, but separately in two different clauses.
 
It aids to link the ideas “we just completed our day’s work” and “our manager gave us more work to do” into a single sentence.
10. I would rather prefer to stay at home weekends rather than travelling or shopping.rather…thanIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “rather…than” is not used together as a whole, but is used separately in two different clauses.
 
It helps to join two ideas “I would prefer to stay at home on weekends” and “I do not prefer to travel or to do shopping on weekends” into a single sentence.
11. Even as we were climbing the bus, it started.even asIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “even as” is used together as whole in the beginning of the sentence as a connector.
 
It helps to associate two ideas “the bus started” and “at that time we were climbing the bus” into a single sentence.
12. No sooner we reached the airport than the flight departed.no sooner…thanIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “no sooner…than” is not used together as a whole, but is utilized separately in two different clauses.
 
It helps to join two ideas “we reached the airport” and “the flight departed immediately after that” into a single sentence.
13. You have to perform well such that we get the overall championship.such thatIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “such that” is used together as whole in the sentence as a connector.
 
It helps to associate two ideas “you have to perform very well” and “your performance should help us get the overall championship” into a single sentence.
14. Just as Ramya entered the hall, so as her husband.just as…so asIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “just as …so as” is not used together but is instead used separately in two different clauses.
 
It helps in linking two ideas “Ramya entered the hall” and “at the same time, her husband also entered the hall” into a single sentence.
15. The more you work hard, the more you will achieve.
 
the more…the moreIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “the more…the more” is not used together as a whole, but is utilized separately in two different clauses.
 
It helps to join two ideas “if you work very hard” and “you will achieve great” into a single sentence.
16. Ruhaan behaves as if he is the captain of the team.as ifIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “as if” is used together as whole in between the two clauses.
 
It helps to join two ideas “Ruhaan is not the captain of the team” and “but he behaves likes the captain of the team” into a single sentence.
17. Math, as well as, science has to be learnt with practical implementation.as well asIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “as well as” is used together as whole in the sentence as a connector.
 
It helps to associate two ideas “math has to be learnt with practical implementation” and “science has to be learnt with practical implementation” into a single sentence.
18. Sumith is neither interested in dancing, nor is he interested in singing.neither…norIn this sentence, the conjunction phrase “neither…nor” is not used together as a whole, but used separately in two different clauses.
 
It connects two ideas “Smith is not interested in dancing” and “Smith is not interested in singing” into a single sentence.
Conjunction Phrase Examples

Conjunction phrase uses

We already know that conjunction phrase helps in linking and connecting. Let us here get to know the various purposes (situations) why conjunction phrases are used.

The table below lists some of the common uses of conjunction phrases.

Uses of Conjunction PhrasesConjunction Phrases that can be used ExamplesExplanations
1. To connect two clauses in which at least one action can happen, will happen or should happen.Either….orYou should either learn French or German in school. In this sentence, the conjunction phrase “either…or” shows that the subject “you” should learn at least any one of languages (French / German)
2. To connect two clauses in which none of the actions or events is true or will happen.Neither…norMy mother drinks neither coffee nor tea.In this sentence, the conjunction phrase neither…nor” is used to show that the subject “my mother” does not drink both coffee and tea.
3. To connect two clauses in which the both the actions are true will happen.a. Both…and
b. Not only…but also
c. as well as
Sundar is not only very intelligent but also a very kind person.In this sentence, the conjunction phrase “not only…but also” depicts Sundar has both the state of beings (intelligent and kind).
4. To connect two clauses whose actions take place at the same time.a. as soon as
b. just as…so as
c. even as
As soon as the classes got over, we left the classroom.The conjunction phrase “as soon as” depicts that the time of leaving the class and time of the class getting over is same.
5. To connect two clauses, where the action in second clause happens immediately after the action in the first clause is over.a. no sooner…than
b. scarcely…when
No sooner Ruhi left the house than my mobile phone rang.The conjunction phrase “no sooner…than” is used to convey that immediately after Ruhi left the house, I got a call and my mobile phone rang.
6. To connect the two clauses whose results must somehow reach to an extentSuch thatThe class performed quite well such that they would be able to beat all their competitors.The conjunction phrase “such that” is used to denote that the performance of the class was so good to the extent that it would defeat all their competitor’s performances.
7. To connect two clauses, which depict a choice or doubtWhether…orShe has still not decided whether to go for the picnic or not.The conjunction phrase in this sentence is “whether…or”. It is used to express the sense of doubt that “she” has in going to the picnic or not.
Conjunction phrase uses

Conclusion

Thus with relevant examples and explanations, the above article portrays what conjunction phrases are, why and how they are used in connecting two or more ideas or clauses, thus making them into a single whole sentence.

Sowndharya Jagadeeswaran

Hi... I am Sowndharya Jagadeeswaran, a university rank holder in M.A. English Literature. I have also done my master's in Business Administration. Inquisitive as I am, my interest in action-oriented research helped me publish research papers in reputed journals. Now, as a career, I am an instructor where I teach young and adorable students the intricate technicalities of Public Speaking and Creative Writing. I also enjoy writing articles on topics I specialize and research in. You can connect with me through LinkedIn.-https://www.linkedin.com/in/sowndharya-j-972378233

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