Adverb modifying another adverb: What, How To Use, Examples, Sentences And Usage


In this article, the concept of an adverb modifying another adverb is explained. It will help us to understand its concept and usage through the use of various examples.

Adverb modifying another adverb is used in grammar to modify an adverb by the use of another one before it. It helps to provide additional information or change the meaning by the use of an adverb modifying another adverb.

Can an adverb modify an adverb?

 Yes, an adverb can modify another adverb. It can be done by placing two adverbs one after the other.

For example-

Raina speaks very softly.

In this sentence, the adverb very is used prior to the adverb softly. Both are adverbs but the adverb “very” which is placed before another adverb is modifying the next one. It is telling the degree of the action being done. It shows that Raina speaks not just softly but extremely or very softly.

It is used to modify another adverb by adding additional meaning to it.

For example-

She never really believed him.

The adverb never is an adverb of time. It is used to modify another adverb “really” in this sentence.

The staff managed the meetings quite well.

In this sentence, the adverb “quite” is a degree adverb. It is used here to modify and add meaning to the sentence. It shows that the meeting was managed well to a significant level.

She joined quite recently in our school.

The adverb quite again is used here to show the degree i.e., very. It shows that she joined the school very recently.

Karishma spoke quite elegantly in her public speaking speech.

The adverb quite is an adverb of degree. It is changing the meaning of the adverb “elegantly” by the addition of quite before it.

So far, we have been gaining profits in our new business.

The adverb “so” modifies the meaning of the sentence. It changes the meaning of the adverb “far” by adding “so” before it.

She is found always outside her house.

In this sentence, the adverb always is an adverb of time. It is a modifier and intensifier that changes the meaning of the adverb “outside.”

There is literally nowhere to go in this city.

The adverb “literally” is a modifier adverb in this sentence. This adverb is modifying the meaning of the sentence and especially the other adverb “nowhere.”

I am quite into hippie music and Bohemian style of clothing.

The adverb quite shows the degree of the action or state. In this sentence, the act of being into hippie music and Bohemian style of clothing is done to a great extent.

That boy is very rarely seen on the streets.

The adverb “very” is an adverb of degree. It is a modifying adverb in this sentence as it modifies the meaning of the adverb “rarely.”

She types very quickly on the keyboard.

The adverb “very” is a degree adverb in this sentence. It is used to add additional meaning to the adverb “quickly.”

A sentence with an adverb modifying another adverb

In this part of the article, we will see an example of an adverb modifying another adverb.

There are many examples through which we can understand the concept of one adverb changing or modifying another adverb. An example of how an adverb modifies another adverb is stated below.

The exam was extremely hard to crack.

In this sentence, the exam was very or extremely difficult (hard) to crack. The adverbs extremely and hard, both are placed one after the other. The adverb extremely is modifying the meaning of the adverb hard by putting an emphasis on the degree of work.

What is modifying adverb?

In this part, the meaning of modifying adverb is defined.

Modifying an adverb is the action of changing the meaning or adding new meaning to the existing adverb. When an adverb is placed before another adverb, it changes its meaning.

 For example

The boy is breathing very heavily.

In this sentence, the adverb very is the modifying adverb. It is placed before the adverb “heavily” to change the meaning of the sentence. The meaning of the sentence without putting “very” is-

The boy is breathing heavily.

Now, the meaning of the sentence is-

An emphasis on the adverb heavily is done by putting “very” before it.

It has changed the degree of the action being taken place in this sentence.

How an adverb modify another adverb?

The action of modifying an adverb by using another adverb is done by putting another adverb before the other. Both the adverbs should be placed one after the other or consecutively to make sense. An adverb usually modifies another adverb by telling in what manner, when, why, where and to what degree, another adverb is. It modifies by adding additional or new meaning to another adverb. They usually work to draw the attention of the readers more towards the adverb by adding another adverb to it.

For example-

The mother roamed very freely in the playground with her children.

In this sentence, the adverb “very” is used to modify the meaning of the adverb “freely.” It fulfils the rule of one adverb following the other without any other parts of speech coming in between. The modifying adverb always comes prior to the adverb being modified. After putting the adverb “very” prior to the adverb “freely” it drew the attention of the readers. The readers are now able to focus and feels drawn towards the adverb “freely” by reading the adverb “very.” In this sentence, the degree of roaming freely is described.

Modifying adverb examples-

In this section, a list of 10 examples with detailed explanation is given.

1. She spoke very quickly as she was getting late for her meeting. 

The adverb “very” is used as an example of an adverb modifying another adverb. The adverb very is adding meaning to the next adverb “quickly.”

2. The girl is very curiously looking at the painting. 

In this sentence, the adverb “very” is an adverb of degree. It is an intensifier or modifier that is modifying the meaning of another adverb “curiously.”

3. The payment was very securely made to the manager.

The adverb “very” is used as a modifier adverb in this sentence. It is so because the adverb of degree “very” is modifying the meaning of another adverb “securely.”

4. She made a very huge size pizza for everyone. 

Here the adverb modifier is “very” that is modifying the meaning of the adverb “huge.”

5. The mother very happily going to see her daughter. 

The intensifier in this sentence is “very”. It is a degree adverb used to modify the meaning of the adverb “happily.”

6. The girl was very anxiously speaking in front of the crowd. 

The adverb “very” is used as a degree adverb in this sentence. It is being used here to add new meaning to the sentence. It is depicting an increase in the degree of anxiousness.

7. The students were behaving quite obediently in the class. 

The modifying adverb is quite as it is added prior to another adverb. Thus, it is changing the meaning of the sentence. Now the degree of the action is depicted here (quite).

8. She spoke very rarely in the class.

The action of speaking is done very less or (rarely) in the class. It shows the degree by which the act of speaking is done. Thus, the modifying adverb is “very” here.

9. He rode his bike very fast. 

The action of riding the bike is done “very’ fast. Thus, the modifying adverb is “very” making the readers pay attention on the action and how it is done.

10. The owner speaks very rudely with her servants. 

The action of speaking is done “very” rudely. Thus, it is adding an additional meaning to it by adding the adverb “very.” It is a degree adverb showing that the owner speaks not just rudely but speaks very or behaves very rudely with her servants.

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